Mobile phone lifeline for those impacted by domestic and family violence

Commissioner Katarina Carroll today presented nearly 100 mobile phones to domestic and family violence (DFV) organisations, DV Safe Phone and Red Rose Foundation.

The Queensland Police Service (QPS) is committed to working with the community to raise awareness and prevent DFV. For many who are impacted by DFV, their mobile phones are often monitored, hacked, broken, stolen or taken as evidence, meaning a second phone can be a lifeline to ensuring they can access the help they need.



The idea behind the DV Safe Phone program originated when program founder, Ashton Wood, stumbled across a few old mobile phones during his COVID-19 inspired house clean.

Ashton launched DV Safe Phone in April 2020, with the aim of ensuring victims of domestic violence have access to a working mobile phone, which can improve and potentially even save a life.

Through DV Safe Phone, donated mobile phones are erased, reset, tested and distributed to victims through Red Rose Foundation, who not only support survivors of domestic violence but also work to end DFV-related deaths in Australia.

Betty Taylor (Red Rose Foundation) and Ashton Wood (DV Safe Phone) received almost 100 mobile phones from Commissioner Carroll

Commissioner Carroll said she was proud the QPS could support the initiative which demonstrated a collaborative community effort to address the impacts of DFV.

“I’m really pleased that we can give back by donating our repurposed corporate and personal mobile phones to the DV Safe Phone initiative,” Commissioner Carroll said.

“The DV Safe Phone initiative embodies the collaborative effort required by all levels within the community to end domestic and family violence in Queensland.”




In just over five months, DV Safe Phone has received 790 mobile phones with 365 phones already been placed directly into the hands of victims of domestic violence through Red Rose Foundation.

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic and family violence, you should report it to police.

Support and counselling is available from the following agencies:

More information is also available from the Queensland Government Domestic and Family Violence portal.

/Public Release. The material in this public release comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here.