QCoast2100 funding makes waves

Minister for the Environment and the Great Barrier Reef and Minister for Science and Youth Affairs The Honourable Meaghan Scanlon

Critical funding is set to flow helping coastal councils develop more climate-resilient communities.

Building on the Palaszczuk Government’s budget announcement last week of $32 million to bolster community climate action, Environment Minister Meaghan Scanlon today said more than $850,000 would be provided to six Queensland councils through its QCoast2100 program to tackle threats from coastal erosion and storm tide inundation.

“The science is clear: climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of weather events,” Minister Scanlon said.

“And while we’ve seen more than $10 billion in renewables investment to tackle climate change, we also need to help councils make sure their communities are equipped to deal with coastal impacts.

The six councils receiving funding are:

  • Bundaberg Regional Council – $164,000 for the Bargara SEMP Implementation Study
  • Cairns Regional Council – $60,000 for a risk analysis of sea level rise and storm inundation on historic and closed coastal landfills
  • Douglas Shire Council – $188,000 for a Community Coastal Rehabilitation & Education Project
  • Gladstone Regional Council – $120,000 for the 1770 coastal hazard resilience and adaptation plan
  • Noosa Shire Council – $200,000 for the Integrated Coastal Management Solutions for Open Coasts and the Living Foreshores Noosa’ Phase 1: Designing for Resilience
  • Sunshine Coast Regional Council – $125,150 for the Collaborative Design of Special Area Adaptation Plans (SAAP)

Minister Scanlon said the research conducted in one area could help councils in other coastal regions of Queensland.

“Through the QCoast2100 program, local governments impacted by coastal hazards can develop cost-effective mitigation strategies and share their research with other affected councils.

“This successful program will help councils protect roads, stormwater infrastructure, recreation facilities and help conserve areas with strong natural values and cultural heritage values.”

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