Dam project to tap cleaner water into Lotus Glen Correctional Centre

An 18-month project to improve the water supply to Lotus Glen Correctional Centre (LGCC) is almost finished, with the completion of two dams with a combined storage of 15 megalitres.

The dams were constructed near the centre’s existing water storage pond by contractors from Wattos Earthmoving, based in nearby Atherton.

LGCC General Manager Chief Superintendent Richard Butcher said the dams were designed to filter sediment out of water supplied from Tinaroo Falls Dam before it entered the centre’s treatment plant to produce its potable water supply.

“It has been a massive project, involving the removal of 3000 cubic metres of rock and 18,000 cubic metres of dirt to form the dam walls,” Chief Superintendent Butcher said.

“Fortunately, we were able to reuse some of the excavated basalt rock for flood mitigation works in a nearby creek, where it also provides habitats for some of our native fauna.”

LGCC has long relied on water from Tinaroo Falls Dam, about 20km away, largely delivered via open channels.

While the dams will go a long way to reducing sediment reaching LGCC’s potable water supply, an ongoing project by Sun Water to replace the open channels with a pipeline is underway to further enhance water quality and reduce water loss through evaporation and environmental factors.

Chief Superintendent Butcher said Lotus Glen Correctional Centre employs a team of over 400 officers to supervise and rehabilitate around 1000 prisoners and positions were becoming available for people who may be interested in working on the front line of public safety.

“QCS want people from all walks of life with great communication skills and real-world experience to join us to keep their communities safe.” Chief Superintendent Butcher said.

“We continue to improve facilities and the centre, and there are many different career opportunities for officers, including a large prison farm. The work on the farm offers a variety of agricultural and horticultural training programs to help prepare prisoners successfully transition into the community on their release.”

“If you are looking for a rewarding and challenging career, I urge you to consider a career in corrective services.”

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