Festive period and re-opening of Qld border helps spending to soar in sunshine state

Clothing stores and entertainment retailers have been the big winners following Queensland’s border re-opening last week.

State-based merchant terminal data from the Commonwealth Bank found spending across Queensland merchants jumped 7 per cent last week in comparison to the week prior.

Clothing stores recorded a 16 per cent spike in spending throughout the week, while amusement/entertainment retailers recorded a 13 per cent jump in spending.

Head of Consumer and Diversified Industries in CBA’s Business Banking division, Jerry Macey, said the upcoming festive period combined with a re-opening of the Queensland border had contributed to the growth in spending recorded across the state.

“Australians from different parts of the country have taken advantage of the reopened Queensland border to head into the sunshine state and enjoy some well-deserved down time over the festive period as well as long-overdue catch ups with family and friends,” he said.

In addition to catching up with family and friends, from the data it would seem many Aussies in Queensland are also taking the time to do a little retail therapy, with spending at clothing stores, department stores and home supply warehouse retailers up 16 per cent, 30 per cent and 12 per cent respectively.

“This level of increased spending is largely unsurprising when you consider the festive period is now right around the corner and many Australians are likely squeezing in some last minute gift shopping for either themselves, or their friends and family.”

Looking ahead, the lead up to Christmas isn’t expected to be the only busy period in terms of spending. New research from the Commonwealth Bank (released yesterday) found 69 per cent of Aussies are planning to take advantage of the Boxing Day sales to secure a bargain or two.

Further, it would seem Aussies have given thought to how much money they may look to spend at the sales, with 40 per cent indicating they will look to spend an average of $557 – up 14 per cent (from $487) this time last year.

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