Increased risk predicted for recreational walkers in Southern region

Recreational climbers of Mount Gillen are being urged to consider alternative walking tracks with the announcement this week of the closure of the walk.

Northern Territory Emergency Service are undertaking a risk assessment of the Mount Gillen track as conditions are considered hazardous given the extreme heat at this time of year and the eroded path.

Regional Manager Southern Command Ian Carlton said that with the announcement of the closure of the path by Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife earlier this week, planning had begun to look at the possibility of an increase in rescues.

“In previous years NTES alongside with St John Ambulance has responded to numerous callouts to rescue those who are either injured on the track, or unable to complete the walk due to a medical condition,” said Mr Carlton

“This has always put our members, who give their time to serve the community, at risk. “

“While this is an unofficial trail, we understand there is a large number of recreational climbers who still use the trail.”

“We anticipate there will be an increase in people using the track prior to the removal of the access point on 1 March 2021, which will further erode the current path, making it more hazardous.”

“This in turns puts further demand on emergency resources and puts our members and everyone else attending, at risk.”

“People don’t realise that rescue is a long process and now that we are in summer, as it is hotter, additional precautions need to be considered by individuals to ensure your own personal safety. Eg water/shade/sunscreen and appropriate clothing with adequate footwear.” For more information check out https://nt.gov.au/leisure/parks-reserves/be-safe/beat-the-heat

Northern Territory Emergency Services are urging recreational hikers to consider alternative trails following the announcement of a popular path closure by Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife earlier this week.

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