Rockhampton’s Wackford Street flood works remain on track

Works are progressing well to protect Rockhampton suburb Park Avenue from flooding with the Wackford Street Drainage Scheme moving into its final stage.

The $3.6 million project is jointly funded by the Queensland Government and Rockhampton Regional Council and will modify and repair the local roads and install extra drainage.

Member for Rockhampton Barry O’Rourke said as the state recovered from the COVID pandemic, infrastructure investment would prove a crucial part of the fightback.

“Building resilient infrastructure supports local jobs, which will boost our region’s economy during this critical stage of our COVID recovery,” Mr O’Rourke said.

“In this current global climate of economic uncertainty, investments like this are helping drive our government’s economic plan to Unite and Recover for Queensland Jobs.

“Residents of Wackford Street have long been concerned about the flooding that occurs in their area during significant rain events. This drainage scheme will give them peace of mind.

“The project will lower costs associated with response, recovery and reconstruction, it will reduce property damage from flooding, and it will enhance property values while putting downward pressure on insurance prices.”

Rockhampton Region Mayor Margaret Strelow said stage one of the works have already improved the stormwater infrastructure of the area.

“Stage one of these works were extensive,” Mayor Strelow said.

“Not only did we improve the existing infrastructure, we also made some major changes to ensure the area can cope with bigger storms and more rain.

“We know residents in this area have been significantly affected by severe flooding events in the past, and these works should make a huge difference.

“We are very proud to be delivering this project with the support of the Queensland Reconstruction Authority.”

Mr O’Rourke said the Palaszczuk Government was committed to not only repairing disaster damage but also increasing community resilience to future disasters.

“The nature of disasters we face in this state can change dramatically, but our focus remains on protecting Queenslanders and the communities they live in,” he said.

“Whether Queensland is facing flooding, bushfires, cyclones or health emergencies like COVID-19, we need to make sure our infrastructure can stand up to anything that’s thrown at it.”

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