Tasmania Police to raise awareness of seven long-term missing people during National Missing Persons Week

Tasmania Police will raise awareness of seven long-term missing people during National Missing Persons Week which starts today.

“National Missing Persons Week is an annual week of action aimed at profiling long-term missing persons and raising awareness of the significant issues surrounding missing persons,” said Sergeant John Delpero of the Tasmania Police Missing Persons Unit.

“While a number of missing persons will be highlighted this week, it is important that we remember all our missing persons and the pain felt by their families and loved ones.”

Currently in Tasmania, there are 168 long-term missing persons dating back to the 1950s.

The seven Tasmanian long-term missing persons being highlighted this week are:

  • Craig Taylor – missing since 1993
  • David Sushames – missing since 2005
  • Michael Lenssen – missing since 2019
  • Nancy Grunwaldt – missing since 1993
  • Robert Mansell – missing since 2015
  • Gilbert Midson – missing since 1964
  • Zedric Woolley – missing since 2012

“As police officers, our aim is to locate missing persons and bring answers. A missing person case is never closed until the person is located. Even in instances where the disappearance of a person is reported to the Coroner, the case remains open,” said Sergeant Delpero.

“This week I urge anyone with information about any missing person to please come forward and help us provide some kind of closure to the families and loved ones of the victims.”

Information relating to a missing person can be provided to Tasmania Police on 131 444 or to Crime Stoppers anonymously online at crimestopperstas.com.au or on 1800 333 000. All information received will be assessed for investigation.


Craig Taylor

Craig Taylor was reported missing from the Coningham area on 3 September 1993, when he was 9 years old.

At the time of his disappearance, Craig and his family were holidaying at Coningham, an area he was familiar with as he had visited on numerous occasions. Craig was of slim build with brown hair.

Police conducted full scale searches of the area however Craig was not located.

Craig was born in the United Kingdom in 1984. Craig later moved to Tasmania and, at the time of his disappearance in 1993, resided at Launceston.

Craig’s disappearance was reported to the Coroner who in 2014 determined he was deceased but was unable to determine the precise cause of death.

Anyone with information about what happened to Craig is asked to phone Tasmania Police on 131 444 or Crime Stoppers anonymously online at crimestopperstas.com.au or on 1800 333 000.


David Sushames

David Sushames was reported missing from Devonport in 2005, when he was 44 years old.

David was last seen at a family member’s home in Devonport on 1 November 2005 (Melbourne Cup Day) and has not been seen or heard from since.

At the time of his disappearance David was 180cm tall, medium build, brown shoulder length hair, blue eyes, fair complexion and a goatee style beard.

David’s disappearance is totally out of character, and foul play is suspected.

Anyone with information regarding David’s disappearance is asked to phone Tasmania Police on 131 444 or Crime Stoppers anonymously online at crimestopperstas.com.au or on 1800 333 000.


Michael Lenssen

Michael Lenssen was reported missing from the Launceston area in 2019, when he was 48 years old.

Michael was reported missing by his family who reside in the Netherlands. He was a Launceston resident, after relocating from Sydney in 2010.

Police investigations established that Michael visited a business in the Launceston CBD on 30 March 2020, but there has been no trace of him since.

Michael is described as around 180cm tall, solid build with short brown hair.

Michael’s disappearance is out of character and concerns are held for his welfare. Investigations surrounding Michael’s disappearance are ongoing.

Anyone with information regarding Michael’s disappearance is asked to phone Tasmania Police on 131 444 or Crime Stoppers anonymously online at crimestopperstas.com.au or on 1800 333 000.


Nancy Grunwaldt

Nancy Grunwaldt was reported missing from north-east Tasmania in April 1993, when she was 26 years old.

Nancy had arrived in Tasmania in March 1993, after she departed her hometown in Germany in 1992, travelling to New Zealand then Australia.

At the time of her disappearance Nancy had recently hired a red mountain bike from a business in Devonport. She was around 168cm tall, with black hair and she wore glasses.

Extensive police searches and investigations were conducted which traced Nancy from Devonport to Launceston to the state’s north-east.

The last confirmed sighting of Nancy was on 12 March 1993, about 5 km south of Scamander, riding a red mountain bike south on the Tasman Highway.

Nancy has not been seen since and she remains a missing person.

Nancy’s disappearance was reported to the Coroner who in 2004 found that she died as a result of foul play.

A $500,000 reward is offered for information that leads to the conviction of offender/s regarding Nancy’s suspected murder.

Anyone with information about what happened to Nancy is asked to phone Tasmania Police on 131 444 or Crime Stoppers anonymously online at crimestopperstas.com.au or on 1800 333 000.

A moving message from Nancy’s sister can be viewed at missingpersons.gov.au/search/tas/nancy-grunwaldt


Robert Mansell

Robert Mansell was reported missing from Flinders Island on 8 August 2015, when he was 42 years old.

Robert was last seen at Salmon Rocks, a popular spot for recreational fishing, at the mouth of the North East River.

Tasmania Police conducted extensive searches for Robert however he was not located.

Robert remains a missing person. At time of his disappearance Robert was 183cm tall, of slim build, had brown hair and small tattoo under his left eye.

Robert’s disappearance was reported to the Coroner who in 2020 determined that he died in suspicious circumstances.

Anyone with information about what happened to Robert is asked to phone Tasmania Police on 131 444 or Crime Stoppers anonymously online at crimestopperstas.com.au or on 1800 333 000.


Gilbert Midson

Gilbert Midson was reported missing from Hobart on 4 November 1964, when he was 23 years old.

On the day he was last seen, Gilbert went to work in Hobart where he was employed as a bus driver. He was 177cm tall, of slim build and had brown hair.

Gilbert has not been seen since, and his disappearance was totally out of character.

At the time of his disappearance, Gilbert was married with a young family and lived in the Hobart suburb of New Town.

Gilbert’s disappearance was recently re-investigated by Tasmania Police and reported to the Coroner.

Anyone with information regarding Gilbert’s disappearance is asked to phone Tasmania Police on 131 444 or Crime Stoppers anonymously online at crimestopperstas.com.au or on 1800 333 000.


Zedric Woolley

Zedric Woolley was reported missing from the Huon Valley on 7 April 2012, when he was 81 years old.

On the day he was last seen, Zedric had lunch with his daughter at a Huonville bakery. He was last seen later that evening driving his blue Hyundai i30 south on the Huon Highway towards Franklin. This is the last confirmed sighting of Zedric, however possible sightings occurred in Huonville on 8 April 2012.

At time of his disappearance Zedric was in reasonable health. He was around 175cm tall, of medium build and had grey hair.

Tasmania Police and volunteers conducted extensive searches.

On 14 April 2012, a family member located Zedric’s Hyundai on Watsons Road, Glen Huon. Despite further searches, Zedric was not located, and he remains a missing person.

Zedric’s disappearance was reported to the Coroner who in 2019 found that his Hyundai became stuck in soft ground at Watsons Road, Glen Huon, following which he walked away from it and died.

Anyone with information about what happened to Zedric is asked to phone Tasmania Police on 131 444 or Crime Stoppers anonymously online at crimestopperstas.com.au or on 1800 333 000.

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