Tradies wanted to teach prisoners life-changing skills

  • ​125 Vocational Support Officers needed across 14 prisons in WA
  • Positions cover 50 different occupations including baking, metal fabricating, gardening, food preparation and painting
  • Chance for experienced workers to pass on life-changing skills
  • Experienced tradespeople are being encouraged to join Western Australia’s Corrective Services with 125 Vocational Support Officer roles now available.

    The positions cover 50 different occupations including baking, cooking, metal fabricating, painting and gardening.

    Vocational Support Officers play an important role in a prisoner’s rehabilitation program.

    They help prisoners upskill and focus on self-improvement so that when they leave prison they are much better placed to find employment or continue with their training.

    The roles, at 14 prisons throughout the State, also include prisoner reception officer and canteen supervisor.

    VSO positions are currently available at the Albany, Bandyup, Broome, Bunbury, Casuarina, Eastern Goldfields, Greenough, Hakea, Melaleuca, Roebourne, Wandoo and West Kimberley prisons, and the Wooroloo and Karnet prison farms.

    For more information, go to justice.wa.gov.au/prisonjobs

    As stated by Corrective Services Minister Francis Logan:

    “As a former tradesperson myself, I know how valuable hands-on skills can be and how rewarding the work is.

    “Vocational Support Officers play a very important role in our prisons and have the opportunity to make a real difference to the lives of the people they work with and to local communities.

    “When I visit our jails across the State, I always know that I will end up speaking to a Vocational Support Officer who will proudly tell me about the prisoners under their care who have gone on to find work on their release.

    “The McGowan Government is a government of job creation and by putting more qualified and committed tradespeople in our jails, we increase the chances that prisoners will find work or further training on release.

    “In turn that benefits the individual and their families, but also the community as we steer people away from reoffending and towards being productive members of society.”

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