ACT Greens call on Australia to join nuclear weapons ban treaty

Australian Greens

The ACT Greens are today celebrating the commencement of the United Nations’ Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, calling on the Australian Government to pledge its support.

The Treaty renders nuclear weapons illegal under international law and is a major international milestone consistent with the Greens’ core value of peace and non-violence.

“For a progressive country with a proud history of leading humanitarian efforts, Australia’s continued relationship with uranium mining and the creation of nuclear weapons is unacceptable, and only brings us closer to the destruction of humanity and our natural world,” said Jo Clay, ACT Greens Member for Ginninderra.

“With climate change upon us, the ACT Greens believe that there has never been a more urgent time for Australia to join its 86 international counterparts and show its commitment to a more peaceful and sustainable future for all of us.”

Since 1945, Australia has been the site of 21 nuclear weapons tests which disproportionately affected First Nations communities and Australian Defence Force personnel. Over 16,000 Australians were affected by the nuclear tests, some of whom still suffer the long-lasting health effects today.

In 2021, more than 400,000 cubic metres of land is still contaminated with plutonium near Maralinga on Pitjantjara land in western South Australia, where the United Kingdom conducted their tests.

All ACT Greens MLAs have signed a parliamentary pledge initiated by the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), calling on the Australian Government to sign and ratify the United Nations Treaty to ban nuclear weapons.

ACT Greens MLAs will tomorrow (Saturday 23 January 2021) attend ICAN’s community celebration at Nara Peace Park at 11am. ACT Greens Leader Shane Rattenbury will be among the speakers at the event, also ringing the Canberra Peace Bell.

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