Liverpool City Council lauds work of local Lioness Club

Lioness High Tea

Liverpool Mayor Wendy Waller has praised the work of Liverpool Lioness Club which has folded after a rich, 40-year history.

The club’s remaining six members opted to close the club after the International Lions Board of Directors decided in 2018 to encourage all current Lioness Clubs to become Lions Club members by June 2021.

Mayor Wendy Waller, who held a high tea at Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre on 25 May to recognise the members, praised their efforts.

“Since the club was inaugurated on 8 May 1981, the Lionesses have raised more than $250,000 in funding and have completed more than 150,000 hours of voluntary work in the area,” Mayor Waller said.

“Their commitment to helping the community is an example for us all and reminds us, particularly during challenging times, of the importance of charity and compassion.”

The club began with a membership of 30 however when Army personnel began to move away from the area it lost members and by 2000 its membership dropped to six. The six remaining members – Ruth Grimson, Nell Corliss, Janelle Collins, Pauline Dinning, Lynette Dupon and Trish Friend – have tirelessly continued the club’s work. The event on 25 May marked the last official event and the closure of the Lioness club.

Mayor Waller commended the contributions of all members.

“Many incredible women have joined the ranks of the Liverpool Lioness Club over the years. Even during COVID-19, the Lionesses continued their incredible work and raised $22,000 in cash donations in the club’s final year,” Mayor Waller said.

The many achievements of Liverpool Lioness Club members include:

  • Building a pergola in Pioneer Park to house the headstones of local, pioneer children.
  • Compiling a booklet called 200 Things to Know About Liverpool, which was printed by Council.
  • Building an aviary and garden at Mainsbridge School.
  • Supporting Liverpool Hospital’s Wig Library for cancer patients, over the past 15 years, by donating more than $31,000 worth of wigs.
  • And, the sweetener: supplying Easter eggs and Christmas puddings to Meals on Wheels annually, worth an estimated $16,000.

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