Marking International Day of People with Disability

International Day of People with Disability is an opportunity to reflect on the contribution of people with disability.

Held each year on 3 December, International Day of People with Disability aims to increase awareness, promote rights of people with disability and celebrate their achievements.

The artistic aspirations and achievements of people with disability are an important and valued part of our cultural landscape, which encourages social inclusivity, inspires creativity and reflects diversity.

To mark this important day many of our cultural organisations are hosting special events, including:

The Australia Council’s annual awards recognise Australian artists and arts-workers who have made an outstanding contribution to the artistic and cultural life of the nation, with recipients announced during a live streamed event.

Screening at the National Film and Sound Archive, the documentary follows 5 Labrador puppies who embark on a 20-month journey to become assistance dogs for people with disability.

Pick of the litter doco. Image of a labrador dog's face.

Live dance performances and a selection of short films from around Australia will be streamed from the National Museum of Australia’s Gandel Atrium, along with special guest Dr Ben Gauntlett, Disability Discrimination Commissioner. Watch live on the Museum’s YouTube channel, with Auslan interpretation and live captioning.

Photo: Participants enjoying iDay at the National Museum of Australia. Photo by Jason McCarthy, National Museum of Australia.

Photo: Participants enjoying iDay at the National Museum of Australia. Photo by Jason McCarthy, National Museum of Australia.

The National Gallery of Australia’s art talks will feature artists Karen Bondietti and Stephen Corsini and ‘Hands On Studio’ program manager Tilly Davey, discussing collaborative and inclusive art practices.

These inclusive National Gallery of Australia (NGA) tours include Sensory Sunday for people on the autism spectrum or with social anxiety and their families, an Auslan interpreted tourfor people who are deaf or hard of hearing and a descriptive tour.

Photo: Conservators installing Mira Gojak's Transfer Station 1 2011, part of the Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now exhibition at the National Gallery of Australia.

Photo: Conservators installing Mira Gojak’s Transfer Station 1 2011, part of the Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now exhibition at the National Gallery of Australia.

ABC iView will be screening a range of programs, including Screenability films, produced in partnership with Screen NSW and Sydney Film Festival.

Take a virtual tour of the collection of portraits by and of people with disability. Each portrait acknowledges the exceptional achievements of the subject alongside their diverse experiences of disability, both visible and invisible.

Photo: Louise Sauvage, 1996 by Montalbetti & Campbell, National Portrait Gallery, Purchased 1999 © Montalbetti & Campbell

Photo: Louise Sauvage, 1996 by Montalbetti & Campbell, National Portrait Gallery, Purchased 1999 © Montalbetti & Campbell

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