Motorcycle Graduated Licensing Scheme reform passes Parliament

The Marshall Liberal Government has today passed legislation through Parliament which will protect South Australia’s most vulnerable road users and prevent further lives lost.

The legislation – the Motor Vehicles (Motor Bike Driver Licensing) Amendment Bill 2020 – passed through the Legislative Council with support from all parties.

Road Safety Minister Vincent Tarzia said the Marshall Government is proud to deliver crucial changes to the motorcycle Graduated Licensing Scheme.

“Our significant reforms raise the minimum age for a learner’s permit and R-Date licence (comparable to a provisional driver’s licence) by two years,” Minister Tarzia said.

“Exemptions will be in place for regional motorcyclists because we acknowledge access to public transport in regional South Australia can be limited.

“This Bill strikes the right balance between improving road safety outcomes and recognising the limited alternative transport options in the regions.

“The key changes delivered by this Government will save lives and reduce trauma on our roads.”

The changes include:

LEARNER’S PERMIT

Minimum age:

  • Increase from 16 to 18.
  • 17 if holding a provisional car licence.
  • 16 if living in regional SA and travelling for education, work or sport.

Restrictions:

  • Zero alcohol.
  • No passengers.
  • Prohibited from towing.
  • No riding between midnight and 5am if under 25.
  • Restricted to motorcycle with automatic transmission only if tested on one.

Period on learner’s permit:

  • Minimum 12 months in all circumstances.

R-DATE LICENCE CLASSIFICATION

Minimum age:

  • Increase from 17 to 19.

Restrictions:

  • Zero alcohol.
  • Restricted to motorcycle with automatic transmission only if tested on one.

Period on an R-Date classification:

  • 2 years.

R LICENCE CLASSIFICATION

Minimum age:

  • Increase from 18 to 21.

Restrictions:

  • Restricted to motorcycle with automatic transmission only if tested on one.

The Government’s Bill is based on recommendations from an expert report provided by the Centre for Automotive Safety Research (CASR) and is strengthened by input from key road safety stakeholders, motorcycle groups and industry representatives.

Tragically, five motorcyclist lives have been lost in 2021. The current number of lives lost is 17 compared to 16 at the same time last year.

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