NHS staff to receive 3% pay rise

  • Government accepts recommendations of NHS independent pay review bodies in full for this year

  • 3% pay rise for NHS staff including nurses, paramedics, consultants, dentists and salaried GPs

  • NHS staff recognised for their pandemic contribution during an unprecedented year

NHS staff including nurses, paramedics, consultants, and dentists in England will receive a 3% pay rise backdated to April 2021 after the government accepted the recommendations of the independent NHS Pay Review Body (NHSPRB) and the Review Body for Doctors’ and Dentists’ Renumeration (DDRB).

For the average nurse, this will mean an additional £1,000 a year, while many porters and cleaners will receive around £540.

The government committed to providing NHS staff with a pay uplift in recognition of the unique impact of the pandemic on the NHS.

The independent pay review bodies considered a range of evidence from organisations including government, the NHS and trade unions in order to reach their recommendations.

Health and Social Care Secretary Sajid Javid said:

NHS staff are rightly receiving a pay rise this year despite the wider public sector pay pause, in recognition of their extraordinary efforts. We asked the independent pay review bodies for their recommendations and I’m pleased to accept them in full, with a 3% pay rise for all staff in scope, from doctors and nurses to paramedics and porters.

We will back the NHS as we focus our efforts on getting through this pandemic and tackling the backlog of other health problems that has built up. I will continue to do everything I can to support all those in our health service who are working so tirelessly to care for patients.

Minister for Care Helen Whately said:

I am determined to make the NHS the best place to work for all our staff and we continue to invest in recruitment and retention with over 45,300 more staff in the NHS now compared to a year ago, including nearly 9,000 more nurses and over 4,000 more doctors.

Our NHS staff have worked incredibly hard to fight the pandemic for over eighteen months and I’m glad to confirm we are accepting the pay review bodies’ recommendations in full this year, so staff in their remit will receive a 3% pay rise.

In addition, salaried GPs’ recommended minimum and maximum pay will be uplifted by 3% whilst dental contracts will be uplifted to account for the 3% uplift for dentists.

Notes

  • The reports will be laid before Parliament at 9:30am tomorrow morning (22 July).

  • The pay rise will be backdated to April 2021.

  • Nurses at the top of band 5 currently earn a salary of £30,600.

  • The DDRB were not asked to make pay recommendations for those Specialty and Associate Specialist (SAS) doctors who have transferred over to the new SAS contract, or doctors and dentists in training, as these groups are in respective multi-year pay and contract reform deals.

  • The SAS deal offers doctors faster progression to the top of the pay scales with meaningful increases at each progression point. The introduction of a new senior SAS grade improves opportunities for career progression. The agreement also introduces safeguards and additional annual leave to support health and wellbeing.

  • GPs are subject to a five-year investment agreement (to 2023/24) between NHSEI and the British Medical Association (BMA) and therefore no pay recommendation has been sought for GP contractors.

  • Dentists will receive a 3% uplift. This is in addition to reduced requirements on the activity they deliver for full payment of their contract, minus agreed deductions, that have been in place throughout and a renewed commitment to reforming the NHS dental contract.

  • Uplifts to dentists will be passed on via an uplift to their contract value.

  • Health spending and public sector pay is a devolved responsibility and it is up to each respective country to determine how they respond to the Pay Review Bodies and what pay uplift to provide for staff.

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