Parkinson to Give President’s Speaker Series Lecture Nov. 20 at UW

man gesturing and talking to people outside

University of Wyoming Professor Bruce Parkinson’s energy research is the topic of the fall semester President’s Speaker Series Wednesday, Nov. 20, at 4:10 p.m. in the Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center. (UW Photo)

University of Wyoming Professor Bruce Parkinson’s energy research is the topic of the fall semester President’s Speaker Series Wednesday, Nov. 20.

Parkinson, the J.E. Warren Professor of Energy and Environment in the Department of Chemistry and School of Energy Resources, will discuss “Our Energy Future from the World to Wyoming” in his free public talk at 4:10 p.m. in the Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center. A reception will follow his talk in the Berry Center.

In his talk, Parkinson will discuss how cheap, abundant energy makes the world’s civilization possible, and how fossil fuels have been the largest source of energy for developing and driving the world’s economy.

“The realization of the probable catastrophic implications of climate change, which is largely driven by greenhouse gas emissions from the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels, provides the urgency for transitioning energy production to carbon-free energy sources,” Parkinson says. “The increase in renewables and natural gas drives the continual decline of coal as an energy source and will negatively impact Wyoming’s future economy.”

His lecture will summarize the history of energy use in the world, and Parkinson will discuss various scenarios for the transition to renewable energy sources for both the world and Wyoming. A plan to keep Wyoming as an energy-exporting state also will be presented by Parkinson.

The President’s Speaker Series encourages and honors individual faculty members who have successfully balanced the research, educational and service goals of the university. The series calls attention to individuals who have made important, well-rounded contributions to the university’s standing.

A committee, composed of the series’ previous honorees, nominates candidates, and the selected faculty member is asked to prepare a public presentation on a topic of national interest. The criteria for selection include a long-term national recognition for research or creative activity and the ability to communicate with all members of the university community.

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