Playground for all seasons

Building a playground next to a wetland where water levels fluctuate throughout the year sounds like a risky task, but that’s exactly what the new playspace at Stamford Park adapts to every day.

The adventure play precinct including play equipment, fitness equipment, paths, landscaping and picnic spaces have all been sensitively designed to accommodate changing water levels and co-exist with the wetland.

“The play and exercise equipment and picnic areas are all positioned in high spots so that they are not covered by water,” says Andrew Barr, Manager Infrastructure.

“The pathways, plants and landscape elements such as the rock stepping stones have been specifically chosen to cope with being covered by water and then drying out.”

The wetlands and adjoining creek at Stamford Park are an area of significant environmental value, providing an important habitat for a wide array of birds, frogs, turtles, native eels, fish and the local colony of platypus.

As well as this, wetlands play an important functional role in stormwater management. Stormwater is collected from the adjacent industrial and residential areas and the wetlands treat it by removing pollutants before returning it to the creek.

The nature of wetlands is that water levels ebb and flow depending on the amount of rainfall, but there will usually be some level of water present. The surrounding Waterlea housing estate also considers this unique environment in its design and layout.

The adventure play precinct is part of a major redevelopment of Stamford Park. Later this year will see the introduction of shared walking and cycling paths and boardwalks through the wetlands, landscaping and revegetation works including a lookout tower and village green for community events, and a specially designed habitat for our local platypus colony.

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