Police warning for long weekend drivers, South Australia

Police are urging South Australians to make sensible and unselfish decisions on the road this long weekend.

The total lives lost on our roads so far in 2022 is 55, as compared to 72 at the same time last year but police are warning against complacency as we take to the roads for long weekend activities.

The total lives lost on our roads so far in 2022 is 55, as compared to 72 at the same time last year but police are warning against complacency as we take to the roads for long weekend activities.

Over the past five years (2017 – 2021), six South Australians have lost their lives to road trauma on the October long weekend and 37 people have sustained serious injuries.

“We are still witnessing the catastrophic effects of the Fatal five on our roads,” Superintendent Bob Gray said.

“Although there have been fewer lives lost than at this time last year, the number is still much too high and our data tells a chilling story of the causes of deaths and serious injuries.”

Police figures show that:

– 33% of lives lost so far this year have involved speeding.

– 30% have involved a person not wearing a seatbelt.

– 29% have listed distraction as a factor.

– 22% have been due to dangerous road use.

– 18% involved drink driving.

– 13% involved drug driving.

Minister for Police Joe Szakacs reinforces to South Australians that distraction and speeding while travelling for the long weekend can have deadly consequences.

“A single life lost on our roads is too many. I urge everyone using the roads this long weekend to drive safe and adhere to road conditions,” Minister Szakacs said.

“The upward trend in fatal crashes on SA roads clearly reinforces that messages about the Fatal Five – Distraction, Drink and Drug Driving, Speeding, Seatbelts and Dangerous road users – must continue to be conveyed towards all South Australians using our roads.”

“I hope everyone travelling both in metropolitan Adelaide and rural South Australia returns home safely from an enjoyable long weekend.”

Police warn it’s not just holiday makers who need to take responsibility for their driving behaviours.

Of the 55 lives lost this year, 67% (37) have been on regional roads with 50% of those being people who live within 20km of where the collision occurred.

“Whether you live in a metropolitan or regional area, you are at risk of dying or being seriously injured if you do not obey the road rules,” Superintendent Bob Gray said.

“Worse still, you are putting other people at risk of death and serious injury – something you and their family would live with forever.”

Police are urging drivers to rest every two hours on long trips, to stick to the signed speed limit, to ensure everyone in the vehicle is wearing a properly fitted restraint, to refrain from being distracted by devices or passengers and not to drive after drinking or taking drugs.

“We are also reminding drivers to drive to the conditions and adjust appropriately if the roads are wet,” said Superintendent Gray.

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