Residential clean-up milestone for Wooroloo bushfire recovery

The community of Wooroloo will be able to move ahead with rebuilding efforts following the completion of clean-up work on the last remaining property damaged by the devastating February 2021 bushfire.

Minister for Emergency Management and National Recovery and Resilience, Senator the Hon Bridget McKenzie, said the last of the burnt waste has been removed from more than 130 properties as part of the Wooroloo Bushfire Residential Coordinated Clean-up Program.

“The clean-up program is one of three programs sharing the $18.1 million joint Commonwealth-State Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements, providing vital community recovery and outreach services to those in need, as well as recreational asset restoration within the local government areas,” Minister McKenzie said.

“The Australian Government continues to provide long-term support including through the Category C Community Recovery Fund,” she said.

Western Australian Minister for Emergency Services, Reece Whitby, said each property posed a unique logistical challenge.

“Despite the challenging weather conditions and the complications of asbestos removal, this clean-up was completed in just over four months from when it began. It is a significant step towards recovery for those in the City of Swan and Shire of Mundaring, however there is still a long road ahead,” Minister Whitby said.

“The efficient completion of the program and positive feedback received from many residents is a testament to the great work of the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation and the other agencies and contractors involved.

“The care and diligence shown by the contractors involved has been outstanding and the support provided by the Department of Communities and local government Community Recovery Officers to help affected residents throughout this process has been remarkable.

“Significantly, a large proportion of the waste from property clean-ups is being recycled for use, including 8,829 cubic metres of rubble and 108 tonnes of steel.

“Some of the recycled material is used to make road base, which is highly suitable for most civil construction applications such as road pavements, car parks, walkways and under concrete pads.

“It also goes towards a wide range of other uses including retaining walls and landscaping, drainage and filtering applications such as those around stormwater pipes and pits, as well as being a useful aggregate for making concrete.”

The clean-up program is overseen by the WA Department of Water and Environmental Regulation, in collaboration with the City of Swan, the Shire of Mundaring, the Department of Fire and Emergency Services and the Department of Communities.

/Public Release. This material from the originating organization/author(s) may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author(s).View in full here.