Support for Tassie to better manage established invasive grasses

Minister for Agriculture and Northern Australia, the Hon David Littleproud MP

Tasmanian Minister for Primary Industries and Water, the Hon Guy Barnett MP

  • Tasmania to receive $495,546 to improve the management of established invasive grasses
  • Part of a $5 million Australian Government funding package to help land managers, the community and industry better manage established pest animals and weeds
  • 11 projects across Australia
  • The Australian Government is providing $495,546 to Tasmania for a project to support land managers to control invasive perennial grasses, through a Federation Funding Agreement with states and territories as part of the $30.3 million Established Pest Animals and Weeds Management Pipeline Program.

    Minister for Agriculture and Northern Australia David Littleproud said invasive grasses can have a detrimental effect on Australia’s agricultural competitiveness and the environment through competition with pastures and native plants.

    “The Tassie project will establish a state-wide network for invasive perennial grasses, ensuring that knowledge and resources can be effectively shared across the state, Minister Littleproud said.

    “It will also support a training and awareness program to ensure Tassie land managers and weed control practitioners are on the front foot in the fight against these priority weeds.

    “The project will also see property plans developed and reviewed for land managers afflicted by invasive grasses, with a focus on the development of plans spanning multiple properties and tenures to ensure that these scourges are being managed on a landscape-scale.”

    Tasmanian Minister for Primary Industries and Water, Guy Barnett said the Australian Government has committed $495,546 to the project which will be complemented by up to $150,000 in co-contributions from the Tasmanian government.

    “This funding will help our farmers to better safeguard against some of our worst weeds including Chilean needle grass and serrated tussock, which not only reduce agricultural productivity, but threaten Tasmania’s world-renowned natural environment,” Minister Barnett said.

    “Australia has some of the most resilient farmers in the world and they do a great job at managing the impact of pest animals and weeds on their land, Minister Littleproud said.

    “However, we recognise that there is a need to improve the tools available to farmers and land managers to manage pest animals and weeds.”

    Minister Littleproud acknowledged the contribution from the Tasmanian government towards the project.

    “This project is a great example of how strong collaboration across governments and land managers can improve the management of established pest animals and weeds, said Minister Littleproud.

    “The Australian Government’s $5 million in funding, supported by cash and in-kind contributions from the state and territories, will deliver 11 projects across Australia to improve the management of established pest animals and weeds that have a detrimental effect on Australia’s agricultural competitiveness and the environment.”

    The Australian Government’s $30.3 million Established Pest Animals and Weeds Management Pipeline Program aims to deliver a lasting legacy to farmers, land managers and the wider community in the fight against established pest animals and weeds.

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