Alpine Way reopens to traffic after bushfire recovery work

Transport for NSW Media Release: Alpine Way reopens to traffic after bushfire recovery work

Alpine Way is now open to traffic between Khancoban and Thredbo after the road suffered extensive damage caused by recent bushfires.

Transport for NSW Regional Director Southern, Jo Parrott, said Alpine Way was closed in late December last year due to a number of active bushfires in the area.

“Although the rain has seen many fires extinguished, the road was badly damaged but we are pleased to see the road reopened to motorists,” Ms Parrott said.

“Transport for NSW crews were only given full access to Alpine Way early last week and needed to clear hundreds of hazardous trees.

“Geotechnical engineers were called in to assess slope stability as this area has very steep slopes with dense vegetation that has been burnt.

“Due to the large amount of recent rainfall, the soil had become very soft and the steep slopes above and below the road needed to be stabilised before traffic could be allowed access.

Transport for NSW Regional Director South West, Lindsay Tanner, said we recognise the inconvenience to the community but safety is our top priority.

“This bushfire-damaged area is a very fragile environment and motorists are urged to drive to the conditions,” Mr Tanner said.

“Slope stabilisation work will continue to be carried out on Alpine Way, 12.2 kilometres west of the Kosciusko National Park Vehicle Entry Station.

“This work includes removing existing rock fill and replacing it with light weight material to reduce further landslips.”

Work will be carried out Monday to Saturday between 6.30am and 6pm from Tuesday 25 February until mid-April. Lane closures and traffic control will be in place during work hours.

For the latest traffic information, visit www.livetraffic.com, download the Live Traffic NSW app or call 132 701.

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