Canadian Coast Guard Ship Hudson returns to support vital science missions after undergoing vessel life extension

From: Canadian Coast Guard

Ottawa, Ontario – The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring members of the Canadian Coast Guard and Fisheries and Oceans Canada have the safe, reliable, and effective equipment they need to do their essential work including important scientific research on climate change, aquatic resource management, ocean conservation and more.

The CCGS Hudson, an Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel, has returned to service following the completion of vessel life extension work at NEWDOCK in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. The work on the vessel included the replacement of steel and repairs to various areas of the vessel’s decks and tanks. In addition, the vessel also underwent maintenance work at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

The work completed on the CCGS Hudson will help ensure the continued delivery of vital science research in the Northwest Atlantic and Gulf of the St. Lawrence, until its replacement vessel is delivered under the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

The CCGS Hudson has now returned to its home port in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, where it has begun preparations for important upcoming science missions scheduled to begin in late summer.

The CCGS Hudson is an integral part of the Coast Guard fleet that undertakes ocean science research, and supports essential Coast Guard programs and services, such as search and rescue.

Quotes

“It is a great pleasure to welcome CCGS Hudson back home following the completion of rigorous refit and maintenance work. Investments in the fleet, as well as the delivery of new vessels under the National Shipbuilding Strategy, demonstrates the Government of Canada’s commitment to the renewal of the Coast Guard fleet. I look forward to seeing the great work this vessel will continue to support, delivering essential science programs that help keep a finger on the pulse of our Atlantic coastal environment and support critical Coast Guard operations.”

The Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

“We’re thrilled to welcome the CCGS Hudson back home to Dartmouth! This floating lab is important for the ocean science and climate change research work performed by Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s scientists. While we await delivery of a new Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel for the Canadian Coast Guard, this investment in refit and maintenance will ensure safety and efficiency as the ship and crew embark on future science missions.”

Darren Fisher, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health, and Member of Parliament for Dartmouth-Cole Harbour

Quick facts

  • Canada’s only East Coast Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel, the CCGS Hudson provides an important platform for monitoring the state of the Atlantic ocean. Serving as a “floating laboratory”, the vessel gathers data and information needed to provide science advice on decisions related to aquatic resource management, ocean conservation, and safe navigation.

  • The Canadian Coast Guard fleet has a maintenance plan for each of its vessels, which respects Transport Canada inspection requirements, to keep its vessels in safe, reliable working condition.

  • In February 2019, NEWDOCK St. John’s Dockyard Limited of St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, was awarded a $10 million contract for the vessel life extension work for the CCGS Hudson.

  • The CCGS Hudson is scheduled to be replaced in 2024 with a new Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel to be delivered under the National Shipbuilding Strategy. The National Shipbuilding Strategy is a long-term commitment to revitalize and re-invigorate a world-class marine industry that supports Canadian technological innovation and brings jobs and prosperity to many communities across the country.

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