New federal investment will help improve women’s economic security in Halifax

From: Women and Gender Equality Canada

The Government of Canada is committed to advancing gender equality and it recognizes the important role that creating more opportunities for women can play in promoting women’s empowerment in all aspects of Canadian life. By investing in projects that improve women’s economic security, we are helping to ensure that women, their families and communities can prosper-and this means a stronger economy for all Canadians.

Today, Andy Fillmore, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism and Member of Parliament for Halifax, on behalf of the Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister of International Development and Minister for Women and Gender Equality, announced a federal investment of $330,418 in the YWCA Halifax to help increase women’s economic security.

The YWCA Halifax will work with key sector partners to look at how workplace culture impacts recruitment and retention of women in well-paid, non-traditional sectors, such as the trades and utilities.

The YWCA Halifax is one of more than 45 projects approved under the Women’s Program in two calls for proposals entitled, Support for Women’s Economic Security and Addressing the Economic Security and Prosperity of Indigenous Women. These projects will build on ongoing efforts to support women’s economic empowerment and advance gender equality for all Canadians.

Quotes

“These projects are so important: they are creating the right conditions for women to thrive in their careers – and their lives. By funding organizations like YWCA Halifax that work to eliminate the barriers holding women back, we are ensuring that all Canadians – regardless of gender – have a real and fair chance at success. Our government knows that when we invest in women, we strengthen the economy for everyone.”

The Honourable Maryam Monsef, P.C., M.P.

Minister of International Development and Minister for Women and Gender Equality

“We need more women in the trades. To do that, we need to act with intention to remove systemic barriers that are preventing more women from entering and succeeding in the sector. The Government of Canada is proud to fund this project led by the YWCA Halifax which will increase women’s economic security by working with key stakeholders to see more women hired, mentored, promoted, and paid well in the trades.”

Andy Fillmore

Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism

Member of Parliament for Halifax

“YWCA Halifax is proud to receive this investment from the Government of Canada. Our project addresses barriers to women in the trades and utilities fields. This type of work requires collaboration with many stakeholders. We are pleased to be working with private sector partners to advance gender equality in Nova Scotia. We are committed to improving opportunities for women to pursue careers that can provide economic security and lasting positive change for their families.”

Donna Snair, Director of Programs

YWCA Halifax

Quick facts

  • McKinsey Global Institute estimates that by taking steps to advance equality for women-such as employing more women in technology and boosting women’s participation in the workforce-Canada could add $150 billion to its economy by 2026.

  • Women continue to be disproportionately affected by economic insecurity. When comparing median hourly wages of women and men aged 15 years and over working full-time in Canada in 2018, women earned just 88 cents for every dollar earned by men. Women of core working age (25-54 years) are also much more likely to work on a part-time basis, making up 75% of all part-time workers in that age bracket in 2018. Just over one-quarter (27%) of women of core working age working part-time reported childcare responsibilities as their reason for working part-time in 2018.

  • Economic security is composed of basic social security, defined by access to basic needs such as health, education and housing.

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