Noventa Energy Partners using innovative technology to cut pollution at Toronto Western Hospital

From: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Fighting climate change and creating a heathier and cleaner future in Toronto, Ontario. The Toronto Western Hospital building is shown.
Noventa Energy Partners Inc. is retrofitting the Toronto Western Hospital with an energy-efficient system funded by the Low Carbon Economy Fund.

Canadians want cleaner air and cleaner water for their children and grandchildren. That’s why the Government of Canada’s strengthened climate plan is helping Canadians cut pollution in their communities, while saving on energy costs and creating good jobs across the country. The plan will create a cleaner and healthier future by investing in our communities with clean energy.

Today, the Member of Parliament for Toronto Centre, Marci Ien, on behalf of the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, announced approximately $3.3 million for Noventa Energy Partners to cut pollution at the Toronto Western Hospital using innovative technology.

The new system will provide clean energy to Toronto Western Hospital, using recovered heat extracted from wastewater and the sewage system. This project will supply about 85% of the hospital’s heating and cooling needs and will help it save on energy costs.

Over the lifetime of this project, the Toronto Western Hospital will see a cumulative reduction of about 169,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions – equivalent to removing approximately 52,000 cars off the road for one year.

The federal funding comes from the Partnerships stream of the Government of Canada’s Low Carbon Economy Challenge, which invests in projects that reduce carbon pollution, save money and create good jobs.

Quotes

“The Government of Canada is pleased to support innovative projects that reduce emissions and create good jobs. Today’s announcement highlights some of the important work Canadian businesses like Noventa Energy Partners Incorporated are doing to help build a cleaner, healthier future. It’s leadership and good projects like the one announced today that will help Canada exceed its 2030 Paris Agreement target and achieve net-zero emissions by 2050.”

– Marci Ien, Member of Parliament for Toronto Centre

“This new wastewater project in Toronto is a great initiative that focuses on the need to address climate change in our everyday lives. I want to thank everyone involved in this project that uses innovative technology to help lower our carbon emissions. My hope is that the success of this project will see us implementing similar technologies and initiatives across the city as we continue to meet our climate change goals.”

– John Tory, Mayor of the City of Toronto

“In addition to the significant energy and environmental benefits, this project will provide meaningful operating cost savings for the hospital and over 500 person years of employment to help our economy recover from COVID-19. It will also be an early warning system to help us respond quicker to future pandemics as the wastewater will be monitored and tested for pathogens and other harmful toxins. None of these benefits could have been realized without the support of the Government of Canada.”

– Dennis Fotinos, Chief Executive Officer, Noventa Energy Partners Incorporated

Quick facts

  • The Low Carbon Economy Fund, which includes the Partnerships stream, is an important part of Canada’s climate action plan, helping put Canada on a path to exceed the Paris Agreement target for 2030.

  • The Low Carbon Economy Fund is supporting energy-efficiency projects in provinces and territories across Canada, which will help Canadians and businesses save money by lowering energy bills. Additionally, support is available for industries to put in place clean technologies that will help them be more efficient and innovative, creating jobs and savings across Canada.

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