NSW residents urged to get free flu shot

NSW residents are being urged to take advantage of the free flu vaccines available for all until the end of June as another 211 people were admitted to hospital with the flu in the week ending 18 June.

So far this year, more than 1,300 people have been admitted to hospital in NSW, following almost 9,400 presentations to emergency departments with influenza-like illness.

NSW Chief Health Officer Dr Kerry Chant said it’s not too late to book in for a free influenza vaccine, which will provide you with vital protection during winter.

“I want to remind people the flu vaccine remains free for all NSW residents for another seven days, so please book in now to take advantage of this important initiative to boost immunity levels,” Dr Chant said.

“The vaccine is the best way to protect yourself, your loved ones and your community from the harmful effects of influenza. I want to thank everyone who has already come forward to get their jab, but there’s still work to be done.

“Influenza immunisation rates aren’t where they need to be. Only about one in three people in NSW have received their influenza vaccine this year and we really need to see that number go up, especially among vulnerable groups such as young children and older people who are most at risk of severe illness.

“We are anticipating a surge in influenza activity right through winter and into spring, so it’s not too late to get vaccinated. There is plenty of stock available at pharmacies and GPs, so please book in today.”

Free flu vaccinations are available to all NSW residents over the age of six months until 30 June 2022, to boost immunity for the winter season. This is especially important if you are at higher risk of severe illness from the flu.

From 1-30 June 2022, free flu shots are available at:

  • GPs for everyone aged 6 months and over
  • Pharmacies for everyone aged 5 years and over.

Little things that can make a big difference when it comes to curbing the spread of viruses this winter. We can help reduce the risk to ourselves and others by:

  • staying home if we’re unwell, taking a COVID-19 test straight away and self-isolating
  • wearing a mask indoors or wherever we can’t physically distance
  • getting together outdoors or in large, well-ventilated spaces with open doors and windows
  • practicing good hygiene by washing or sanitising our hands often
  • taking a rapid antigen test to test for COVID-19 before visiting vulnerable loved ones or going to large gatherings and events
  • staying up to date with our vaccinations – for both flu and COVID-19.

For information on flu vaccination, visit Vaccination in NSW.

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