A unique and authentic wildlife experience for children

Minister for the Environment and the Great Barrier Reef and Minister for Science and Youth Affairs The Honourable Meaghan Scanlon

Students will be transported to one of Queensland’s vibrant National Parks when they step into a new and immersive learning environment at David Fleay Wildlife Park.

Minister for the Environment Meaghan Scanlon said the $40,000 exciting new education rooms would provide a unique and authentic wildlife experience for children.

“The new room at David Fleay Wildlife Park connects students with wildlife and the environment in an educational setting,” Minister Scanlon said.

“The room replicates the iconic and beautiful rainforest habitat of the Springbrook National Park and Lamington National Park achieved through floor to ceiling wall art, natural and artificial flora.

“A combination of living plants and an artificial environment will allow students to be transported to a location that epitomizes the local national parks and gives them a unique opportunity to interact up close with the park’s wildlife ambassadors. The room is the first of its kind in Queensland.

“Students will see wildlife up close, naturally displaying their unique behaviours, while our rangers can help students learn about those incredible animals and the special habitat they live in.”

Minister Scanlon said the room caters for class groups ensuring every student can be engaged in the experience.

“Staff at the David Fleay Wildlife Park expect up to 20,000 students to visit the room in the next year, and that number is expected to grow annually,” she said.

“The authentic learning experiences align with the national education curriculum and reinforce the Queensland Government’s conservation messaging.

“The new space is inspired by a key message of David Attenborough, who said ‘No one will protect what they don’t first care about, and no one will care about what they don’t first experience.’

“Students are our future conservation champions and we hope by visiting the new room, they will learn more about our environment, the unique ecosystems within, and do what they can to protect it.”

A few of the wildlife ambassadors that students will be able to meet include:

  • Squirrel gliders
  • Red tailed black cockatoo
  • Pademelon
  • Tawny Frogmouth
  • Eclectus parrots
  • Reptiles
  • Potoroo
  • A Bridled Nailtail Wallaby called Flash who represents a species that was thought to be extinct for over 30 years

David Fleay Wildlife Park was established in 1952 by Australian naturalist David Fleay, and added to the Queensland Heritage Register in February 2001. The park is home to more than 80 species of animals. Each year, more than 42,000 people visit the park.

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