Federal Seat Polling: Overwhelming Support for Anti-Corruption Body With Teeth

New research from The Australia Institute has shown that a significant majority of voters in the Coalition held Federal Electorates of Robertson, Bass and Mallee support the creation of a national integrity body with the power to conduct public hearings and investigate whistle-blower complaints.

The survey results were released at a Parliament House press conference today featuring Shadow Attorney General Mark Dreyfus QC, independent MPs Helen Haines, Zali Steggall and Andrew Wilkie, Centre Alliance Member for Mayo Rebekha Sharkie, Greens Senator Larissa Waters, independent Senators Jacqui Lambie and Rex Patrick along with Stephen Charles QC and Anthony Whealy QC from The Australia Institute’s National Integrity Committee of former judges.

Key results, Robertson:

  • 2PP: Liberal Party 50%, Labor Party 50%.
  • Nine in ten voters in Robertson (92%) support the establishment of a Commonwealth Integrity Commission.
  • Eight in ten voters (83%) say such a body should have the power to hold public hearings. 87% say it should have the power to receive and act on whistle-blower complaints.

Key results, Bass:

  • 2PP: Liberal Party 54%, Labor Party 46%.
  • Eight in ten voters in Bass (82%) support the establishment of a Commonwealth Integrity Commission.
  • Eight in ten voters (79%) say such a body should have the power to hold public hearings. 85% say it should have the power to receive and act on whistle-blower complaints.

Key results, Mallee:

  • 2PP: National Party 65%, Labor Party 35%
  • Nine in ten voters in Mallee (90%) support the establishment of a Commonwealth Integrity Commission.
  • Eight in ten voters (79%) say such a body should have the power to hold public hearings. 85% say it should have the power to receive and act on whistle-blower complaints.

“Our research shows that the Australian public want to see an anti-corruption body established at the Commonwealth level that has the power it needs to actually get the job done,” said Ben Oquist, executive director of The Australia Institute.

“This is not a partisan issue. Australians of all political stripes want an anti-corruption body to be established and they want it done right.

“Establishing an integrity body without the power to hold public hearings or investigate whistle-blower complaints would fall well short of the mark for the vast majority of voters.”

/Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization/author(s)and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author(s).View in full here.