Kelley School researcher to advance secure, energy-efficient technology in manufacturing

INDIANAPOLIS — A researcher in the Indiana University Kelley School of Business at IUPUI is part of a multidisciplinary, multi-institution team that received a $70 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to advance the use of secure and energy-efficient technology in manufacturing.

Amrou Awaysheh, an assistant professor of operations management, will conduct the work under the Cybersecurity Manufacturing Innovation Institute, or CyManII, a new cybersecurity manufacturing innovation institute. The U.S. Department of Energy awarded $70 million to CyManII, led by the University of Texas at San Antonio, to create the institute, which involves a consortium of institutions, including IU.

Amrou Awaysheh of the IU Kelley School of Business at IUPUI
Amrou Awaysheh will help advance energy-efficiency research in U.S. manufacturers through the new Cybersecurity Manufacturing Innovation Institute. Photo courtesy of the IU Kelley School of Business at IUPUI

Awaysheh has the potential to secure over $2 million over the next five years in helping advance energy-efficiency research in U.S. manufacturers.

CyManII will address the biggest challenges facing cybersecurity in the U.S manufacturing industry. It also aims to address the need to develop the workforce necessary for an innovative environment. The vision for CyManII is to introduce a cybersecure energy ROI for energy-efficient manufacturing and supply chains that secures and sustains American leadership in global manufacturing competitiveness for decades.

IU is one of 24 universities whose research in cybersecurity, education and workforce development will contribute as managing members in this institute. Other national labs and industry leaders have also been proposed to sign on to be part of CyManII.

IU is home to the Kelley School of Business Center for Excellence in Manufacturing and offers a premier multidisciplinary program bridging law, business and IT for cybersecurity risk management as well. IU is also home to the IoT Energy Efficiency Lab, founded and directed by Awaysheh, which uses big data to help manufacturing facilities reduce energy consumption.

“I am proud to be part of this national effort to ensure energy efficiency in a cybersecure world,” Awaysheh said. “Through ongoing sustainability research, I will continue working with manufacturing facilities to help them better understand how they are using energy and how to conserve that energy. When companies reduce their energy costs, they decrease their costs overall, making them more competitive. I’m excited to be able to contribute to this inspiring project that will help U.S. manufacturers continue to be competitive in a global economic environment.”

As part of his research, Awaysheh has been installing meters within manufacturing facilities to measure energy usage on each machine — and to determine how to save energy and, in turn, money. He’s already seen more than $100 million of energy savings in U.S. facilities using these smart meters. Under CyManII, Awaysheh will continue to work with these partners to advance the adaption of this technology, as well as explore new ways to strengthen the cybersecurity of technology that supports energy efficiency in manufacturing.

What they’re saying:

“We are delighted to be involved with these world-class institutions in this important effort to enhance cybersecurity in manufacturing in America. Through this partnership, IU and the Kelley School will contribute to efforts that reduce energy, which will help American manufacturing stay competitive globally for years to come. Professor Awaysheh’s research impacts important sustainability efforts across the country, and we’re proud to have him on our faculty.” — Idalene “Idie” Kesner, dean of the Kelley School of Business and the Frank P. Popoff Chair of Strategic Management

“Indiana stands as one of the major hubs for supply chain and manufacturing nationally and globally, motivating our faculty and students to solve current and future challenges related to cybersecurity and energy consumption. Professor Amrou Awaysheh from our Kelley School on the IUPUI campus is leading the effort in Indianapolis for this large national consortium of partners. We look forward to new collaborative opportunities for our students as part of this program, as well as innovations that go beyond our state as a result of Awaysheh’s exciting research.” — Janice Blum, vice chancellor for research and graduate education at IUPUI

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