Promise of inclusive sustainability

American Institute of Biological Sciences

Historically, shared resources such as forests, fishery stocks, and pasture lands have often been managed with an aim toward averting “tragedies of the commons,” which are thought to result from selfish overuse. Writing in BioScience, Drs. Senay Yitbarek (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Karen Bailey (University of Colorado Boulder), Nyeema Harris (Yale University), and colleagues critique this model, arguing that, all too often, such conservation has failed to acknowledge the complex socioecological interactions that undergird the health of resource pools.

The authors, who describe themselves as Blackologists (“‘not simply scholars that are Black but, rather, are scholars who deliberately leverage and intersect Blackness into advancing knowledge production”), elucidate a model in which researchers’ life experiences provide “unique perspectives to critically examine socioecological processes and the challenges and solutions that arise from them.”

In this episode of BioScience Talks, Yitbarek, Bailey, and Harris join us to discuss this model of inclusive sustainability and the ways in which it can be brought to bear in service of ecosystems and the humans who inhabit them.

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