Unleaded petrol colour changes

  • Dyes used to identify grades of petrol no longer required
  • Transitional period of up to 12 months now in place
  • Fuel performance not affected by the changes

Motorists and fuel industry participants are being advised that dyes will no longer be required in all unleaded petrol (ULP) grades in Australia, a change that took effect on 1 August 2021.

In 2015/16 the removal of red/orange dye from ULP and E10 resulted in these grades being coloured pale yellow to yellow, but premium grades of petrol (PULP/95 RON and 98 RON) were still required to be coloured yellow. Now, all grades of unleaded petrol may range from colourless to yellow (refer to chart below).

It’s expected that the transition will take up to 12 months and, in the meantime, both dyed and undyed petrol grades will be present in the marketplace.

The colouring specifications was used to assist workers to identify the different grades of petrol in the supply and distribution process, but improvements in monitoring equipment and procedures now means it is no longer required.

FuelWatch Manager Ben Derecki said these changes will not have an impact on the performance of the fuels as the colouring is purely aesthetic.

“Motorists will not be affected by the change but it’s necessary for the industry and community to be aware of the new requirements to prevent any confusion,” Mr Derecki said.

“The advantage of removing the colour requirement is that Australia will be aligned with international practices and this will make it easier for importers and local suppliers of these fuel products.”

Low aromatic fuels used in some communities will not be subject to this change and will remain yellow in colour.

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