A plan to ensure greater funding for First Nations children, families and communities

From: Indigenous Services Canada

Canada, the Assembly of First Nations and the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada develop plan to ensure greater funding for First Nations children, families and communities

“On April 19, 2021, the Government of Canada submitted a plan developed in consultation with the Caring Society of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. The plan will include an approach that would provide additional funding for First Nations children and families living on-reserve and in Yukon who are not served by First Nations Child and Family Services (FNCFS) agencies.

I am pleased to say that we worked closely with the Caring Society and the AFN to develop a plan that will ensure the smooth implementation of this funding approach to support First Nations in the delivery of key services.

This additional funding is intended to support the development and delivery of prevention services to First Nations living on-reserve and in Yukon that can address their historical, cultural and geographic needs and circumstances, and-ultimately-keep children and families together.

This is part of the investment announced in Budget 2021 of $1 billion over five years, and $118.7 million ongoing starting in 2021-22, to increase funding under the FNCFS program.

Reducing the number of Indigenous children in care remains one of the government’s top priorities. We are continuing this important work in full partnership with Indigenous Peoples to reform child and family services so that all Indigenous children have the opportunity to grow up in their communities, immersed in their cultures and surrounded by their loved ones.

On behalf of the Government of Canada, I would like to extend my appreciation to the Caring Society and the AFN, as well as to all of the Indigenous rights-holders and partners who are working hard to ensure equitable funding for First Nations children and families. These combined efforts help bring us closer to our shared goal of achieving an overall reform of the FNCFS program, and supporting the health and safety of First Nations children, families and communities.”

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