Powered by St. Jude, Together, Web-Based Patient Education Resource on Childhood Cancer, Plans to Launch

Picture of computer with hands pointing at screen.

Together by St. Jude offers trustworthy medical information about pediatric cancer and shared stories of hope to families around the world.

In recognition of Health Literacy Month, Together by St. Jude announces plans to launch in seven additional languages: Farsi, Mongolian, Portuguese, Sinhala, Swahili, Tamil and Urdu.

In 2018, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital launched Together, a comprehensive online resource for patients and families of children and teens diagnosed with cancer. Today, the website is available in 8 languages: Arabic, Burmese, simplified Chinese, English, French, Hindi, Russian and Spanish. With over 500 pages of content, the website has reached more than 6 million people in over 220 countries and territories.

Together contains trustworthy information about diseases, treatment options, and side effects. It also offers supportive care resources and shared stories of hope, healing and experience.

Together supports the mission of St. Jude Global, a cross-functional effort, led by the Global Pediatric Medicine Faculty, focused on advancing the science of the global childhood cancer problem.

“Together by St. Jude seeks to reach as many families and patients with childhood cancer as possible around the globe-especially in low- and middle-income countries,” said Beth Bartholomew, manager of the website.

“Because childhood and adolescent cancer is rare, many families are not able to find trusted resources,” said Alberto Pappo, M.D., a member of the St. Jude faculty and an adviser for the website. “Having the information in different languages is vital, so that it can be accessible to families worldwide.”

The information on the Together website is generated from the latest research and best practices in pediatric oncology. St. Jude staff curate, produce and review articles, animations, illustrations, and video features published on the site.

“When a child is diagnosed with cancer, it is overwhelming,” said St. Jude President and CEO James R. Downing, M.D. “It is crucial that parents and patients have reliable and useful health information, educational resources and the perspective of others who are affected by pediatric cancer. By providing patients and families this information in their native language, Together gives people around the world access to our St. Jude expertise as well as a support system of other families experiencing childhood cancer.”

The site also offers resources that encompass a range of cancer experiences, including long-term survivors and bereaved parents-not just from St. Jude, but from families treated at other hospitals across the U.S. and around the world.

The website also features:

  • Together Blog, which features a variety of voices on timely topics.

Together is an extension of the vision of St. Jude founder Danny Thomas. He established the hospital in 1962 because he believed that “no child should die in the dawn of life.” The institution seeks to move beyond the walls of its hospital and affiliate clinics to offer a trusted resource and community to families worldwide, no matter where children are treated.

St. Jude Global

The St. Jude Global initiative, led by the St. Jude Department of Global Pediatric Medicine, leverages the resources and expertise of St. Jude and partners around the world to improve survival rates of children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases, regardless of nationality or geographic location. It focuses on three core areas: education, capacity building and research. In May 2018, World Health Organization designated St. Jude its first WHO Collaborating Centre for Childhood Cancer in a push by both organizations to expand efforts that will advance pediatric cancer survival rates worldwide. In September 2018, WHO and St. Jude launched the Global Childhood Cancer Initiative, a five-year collaboration aimed at transforming cancer care worldwide to cure at least 60% of children with six of the most common types of cancer by 2030.

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