RTC Moves Recruit Initial 14-day ROM out of Fort McCoy

US Navy

After an 8-month joint-service endeavor between Recruit Training Command (RTC) and Fort McCoy, a U.S. Army training center in western Wisconsin, RTC began moving the command’s recruit restriction of movement (ROM) site from Ft. McCoy to RTC’s facilities April 19.

GREAT LAKES (NNS) – After an 8-month joint-service endeavor between Recruit Training Command (RTC) and Fort McCoy, a U.S. Army training center in western Wisconsin, RTC began moving the command’s recruit restriction of movement (ROM) site from Ft. McCoy to RTC’s facilities April 19.

The command’s ROM site had been located at Ft. McCoy since August 2020.

“We are grateful to the Fort McCoy Army leadership for their outstanding support that enabled us to achieve our mission,” said Capt. Erik Thors, commanding officer, RTC. “We could not have achieved the same level of success we did without Fort McCoy and multiple Navy commands who provided personnel support.”

RTC began housing incoming recruits on site April 19 to execute their initial 14-day ROM prior to beginning boot camp at RTC.

Executing ROM at RTC provides leadership more flexibility regarding staff schedules. It also allows supporting Sailors to return to their parent commands after months of hard work away from their families to support the RTC mission.

“The transition of ROM operations from Fort McCoy to RTC is an important first step to normalizing training operations during the pandemic,” said Rear. Adm. Jamie Sands III, commander, Naval Service Training Command. “We could not have successfully trained new recruits during these past eight months without the help and support of Fort McCoy, the Army, the Wisconsin National Guard, and the hard work and flexibility of RTC’s staff.”

RTC continues to work with medical experts to ensure it can train recruits while preventing the transmission of COVID-19.

Boot camp is approximately eight weeks and all enlistees into the U.S. Navy begin their careers at the command. Training includes physical fitness, seamanship, firearms, firefighting and shipboard damage control along with lessons in Navy heritage and core values, teamwork and discipline. More than 40,000 recruits train annually at the Navy’s only boot camp.

For more news from Recruit Training Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/rtc .

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