Upper Hunter Polling: Majority of Voters Agree with Turnbull Call for Moratorium on New Coal Mines

Australia Institute

The majority of voters (57.4%) in the NSW state seat of Upper Hunter support former PM Malcolm Turnbull’s call for a moratorium on new coal mine approvals and a remediation plan for existing mines for the Hunter Valley.

The Australia Institute surveyed a nationally representative sample of 686 residents in the NSW state seat of Upper Hunter during the nights of the 7th and 8th of April 2021.

Key findings:

  • The majority of voters (57.4%) in the NSW state seat of Upper Hunter support former PM Malcolm Turnbull’s call for a moratorium on new coal mine approvals and a remediation plan for existing mines for the Hunter Valley.
  • Of the 57.4% who support, one in three voters (34.1%) strongly support. Meanwhile, of the 35.1% of voters oppose, 16.3% strongly oppose.
  • Majority support for moratorium on new coal mines in the Hunter was observed across most voting intentions, Nationals voters 54.1% support, Labor voters 69.8% support, Greens voters 91.3% support, Shooters Fishers & Farmers Party 56.7% support.
  • Vast majority support (89.5%) the idea that coal mining companies should have to pay an upfront bond to fully cover the costs of rehabilitating their mine sites once mining operations cease, with only 6.8% disagreeing.

“This research shows that a moratorium on new coal mines in the Hunter Valley not only makes economic sense and environmental sense, but is also backed by the electorate,” said Richard Denniss, chief economist at the Australia Institute.

“It is clear that the people of the Upper Hunter are seeing firsthand that new coal mine approvals destroy prime Australian farmland, impact current and future investment in Australia’s agriculture, wine, and tourism industries. These approvals are leaving lasting scars on the Upper Hunter.

“Upper Hunter voters from across the political spectrum agree with former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s call for a moratorium on new coal mines in the Hunter Valley.”

/Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here.