Victorian government funding boost for new anti-inflammatory treatments

Hudson Institute

Hudson Institute’s groundbreaking research into new anti-inflammatory treatments has attracted the support of the Victorian government, in recognition of its potential to treat COVID-19 and other infectious diseases.

Associate Professor Michael Gantier's groundbreaking research into inflammation has attracted funding support from the Victorian government to assist with new anti-inflammatory treatments.
Associate Professor Michael Gantier

The Victorian Government has granted $1.45 million to Hudson Institute of Medical Research, working with its collaborator Pharmorage Pty Ltd, to fund the joint development program of novel anti-inflammatory compounds.

New anti-inflammatory drugs

It is frequently the body’s excessive inflammatory response to COVID-19, rather than the virus itself, which makes it potentially lethal. This research aims to identify new drugs that dampen harmful inflammation.

Lead researcher, Associate Professor Michael Gantier, said this funding will turbocharge his work on new anti-inflammatory treatments.

“Before any drug can reach the market a great deal of work needs to be done to select the most potent candidates and then test the compounds involved in disease models,” he said. “This grant will allow us to multiply the volume of work we can do in this area, so we can deliver better results sooner.”

Research vital for new anti-inflammatory treatments

Director and CEO of Hudson Institute, Professor Elizabeth Hartland, welcomed this investment in inflammation research and new potential anti-inflammatory treatments by the Victorian government: “Hudson Institute is Australia’s largest centre for inflammation research, and we are excited to see the potential of A/Prof Gantier’s pioneering work recognised by the Victorian government.”

“Inflammation underpins hundreds of health conditions, contributing to more than 50 per cent of deaths worldwide and is an escalating burden of disease,” Prof Hartland said. “The pandemic has illustrated to the world how important this field of research is, and will remain.”

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