Neutrons help develop more reliable aerospace materials and components

Robert Carter from NASA's Glenn Research Center (left) and Daira Legzdina from Honeywell Aerospace  examined high-temperature nickel alloy samples containing linear friction welds. Image credit: ORNL/Genevieve Martin

Robert Carter from NASA’s Glenn Research Center (left) and Daira Legzdina from Honeywell Aerospace examined high-temperature nickel alloy samples containing linear friction welds. Image credit: ORNL/Genevieve Martin

Neutrons at work for NASA and Honeywell Aerospace

NASA and Honeywell Aerospace teamed up with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) materials scientists to examine high-temperature nickel alloy samples containing linear friction welds.

The scientists used ORNL’s VULCAN engineering materials neutron diffractometer, which is designed for nondestructive studies of deformation, phase transformation, residual stress, texture, and microstructure. Load frames, furnaces, battery chargers, and other auxiliary equipment for in situ and time-resolved measurements are integrated into the instrument.

Neutrons diffraction is a versatile tool

Neutron diffractometry is useful in a broad range of applications in materials science and engineering, such as residual stress determination in engineering components and understanding the fundamental aspects of material behavior during synthesis, processing, and under operating conditions.

Research that can benefit from using VULCAN include observing material behavior during processing or synthesis, loading studies of crystalline/amorphous materials at high temperatures, and studies of operating systems such as batteries and hydrogen storage devices.

For more details, visit

https://neutrons.ornl.gov/content/honeywell-and-nasa-are-studying-residual-stress-using-vulcan

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