Engineering under Quad

King’s College London

A new home for Engineering teaching

King's College London Quad
The Quad at King’s College London

A new home for Engineering teaching

Work is well underway on the state-of-the-art Quadrangle (Quad) redevelopment, which is set to benefit the entire King’s community by transforming the heart of the Strand campus with improved aesthetics, whilst delivering modern Engineering teaching space designed to encourage and foster collaboration for both academics and students.

We educate the engineers of the future to take a creative approach to problem solving, to investigate and inquire as well as to innovate and create.– Professor Barbara Shollock

The development brings almost 3,000 square metres into use, over two floors, and provides a new teaching home for King’s Department of Engineering, tailored to meet the specific needs of students and staff alike. Facilities include:

  • Experimental lab space with cutting-edge research facilities

  • Maker spaces fitted with tools and equipment to allow students to move from theory to problem solving to prototype creation

  • Fabrication lab providing heavier equipment for students to build complex projects

  • Design and build space, in the historic vaults under the Quad, will be a hub for students on the Strand campus.

Positioning group learning and design areas opposite maker spaces will allow students to theorise and test solutions, fostering an environment of collaboration with prototyping and developing that will see these spaces become a hub for hands-on teaching and project work.

The second floor is dedicated to labs for students to study the fundamental principles of engineering science through experiments in topics including fluid dynamics, mechanics and electronics. The modern laboratories will provide the perfect space to discover and experiment, enabling the next generation of engineers to find solutions to real world problems.

King’s has a long and distinguished history in engineering and science, spanning nearly two centuries. King’s students have learnt from such eminent scientists as James Clerk Maxwell, Charles Wheatstone and Sir William Siemens. This inquisitive and bold spirit continues today. The department is looking forward to welcoming students and researchers into the new space and watching the next generation of King’s engineers thrive.

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