Evenings with Genetics spotlights tuberous sclerosis complex

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurocutaneous syndrome that affects the brain, heart, eyes, kidneys, skin and lungs. Due to genetic mutations, cells in those organs grow without regulation, causing benign tumors to develop. Other neurological issues like seizures can also occur. Experts at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital will address this genetic disorder during the Evenings with Genetics virtual seminar on Tuesday, Dec. 8, at 7 p.m.

During the hourlong webinar, Dr. Rohini Coorg, assistant professor of pediatrics – neurology at Baylor and director of the Comprehensive Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic at Texas Children’s, will explain how TSC occurs, how it is diagnosed and how different conditions associated with the diagnosis may be treated. Dr. Lisa Emrick, assistant professor of pediatrics – neurology at Baylor, and Roa Sadat, genetic counselor at Baylor and Texas Children’s, will discuss how an improved understanding of genetics has changed the approach in diagnosing TSC. A mother of a young adult with TSC will also join the panel to share her own family’s experience, including how genetics played a role in family planning.

“This talk will explain the complexity of TSC and emerging medical and surgical therapies that have the potential to change the trajectory of this disease,” Coorg said. “We will also explain the need for multiple subspecialists with a unified and individualized approach to medical care. We hope our families will feel empowered and encouraged after leaving our session.”

Evenings with Genetics is a regular speaker series hosted by Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital that offers the most current information on care and research advances for many genetic conditions. The seminars provide an opportunity for families in the genetics community to interact with others experiencing similar situations.

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