Geomagnetism research showcased at Royal Society Summer Exhibition

University of Liverpool scientists will showcase their research into the study of Earth’s magnetic core at the prestigious Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2019 which opens to the public today (Monday 1 July).

The team is one of 22 exhibitors at the annual display of the most exciting cutting-edge science and technology in the UK and will highlight how Liverpool’s research is breaking new ground in the field.

The Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition is a free annual event for visitors of all ages and features curated exhibits alongside a series of inspiring talks and activities.

Hands on exhibit

The ‘Magnetic to the Core’ exhibit explores how it is possible to study the strength and behaviour of the Earth’s magnetic field over billions of years, and the insights this gives us.

Visitors will gain an insight into how Earth’s magnetic field arises from fluid motions in the outer core of our planet, what this can tell us about our planet’s interior and processes, why it is so important to our daily lives and how scientists are able to study it through paleomagnetism.

They will be able to find out which rocks are real and which ones are made of chocolate without breaking their teeth. There is also an interactive magnetic globe where visitors can simulate a magnetic reversal, and a custom-made magnetometer to measure the magnetic memory of rocks.

Liverpool scientist Annique van der Boon, who is leading the exhibit, said: “We are delighted that Liverpool’s research into Earth’s magnetic field has been recognised by the Royal Society for being at the cutting edge of research into Earth’s interior.”

“This exhibition is a perfect opportunity to showcase our study into the deep workings of our planet using paleomagnetism and we hope ‘Magnetic to the Core’ provides an interactive combination of fun and learning around Earth science.”

World leading

The exhibit draws on research and teaching from the University’s Geomagnetism Laboratory which comprises the Leverhulme-funded Determining Earth’s Evolution through Paleomagnetism (DEEP) group, and several NERC projects. These awards, held by exhibit team members Professor Andy Biggin and Dr Greig Paterson, are providing key additional funding to highlight the exciting geomagnetic research currently performed at Liverpool.

The Geomagnetism Laboratory brings together world-leading research expertise across geophysics and geology to develop palaeomagnetism as a tool for understanding deep Earth processes occurring across timescales of thousands to billions of years.

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